Dealing with Heroin Addiction

Heroin is a highly addictive illegal drug, it is the fastest acting opiate, it is processed from morphine, a substance that is extracted from certain varieties of poppies or opium poppies.
Heroin is usually aspirated, injected, inhaled, or smoked rapidly enters the brain, and binds to opioid receptors in cells located in many areas, especially those involved in feelings of pain and pleasure and in the control of heart rate, sleep, and breathing.

Chronic heroin use produces physical dependence, a state in which the body adapts to the presence of the drug. The consumer may experience severe withdrawal symptoms if they abruptly decrease or discontinue use. These symptoms, which can begin within a few hours of the last administration of the drug, may include restlessness, muscle and bone pain, insomnia, diarrhea and vomiting, goosebumps (“break in the cold” or “ cold turkey ”) and kicking the habit movements.

There are a wide variety of therapeutic options for heroin addiction, including medications and behavioral therapy. Science has shown that pharmacotherapy, in conjunction with other support services, is an effective combination to get the patient to stop using heroin (or another opiate substance) and return to a more stable and productive life.

Are you or a loved one looking for a Heroin Rehab center in South Florida? We have someone standing by to help and answer any questions. Call Now: (877) 357-3422

Heroin Addiction Treatment and rehab in South Florida

The more premature the intervention, the greater the guarantees of a good result in heroin rehabilitation

. Treatment begins with the initial evaluation, which allows objectifying the intensity of the problem and adapting the therapeutic intervention to the needs of the patient.

Treatment usually begins with a period of detoxification, which allows the use of heroin to be stopped. This initial phase is followed by a process of cessation in which the patient’s initial objective is to overcome his psychological dependence and lead a satisfactory life in the absence of the addictive substance.

There are a wide variety of therapeutic options for heroin addiction, including Psychotherapies (individual and/or group) and Pharmacotherapy, this is an effective combination to get the patient to stop using heroin (or another opiate substance) and return to a more stable and productive life.

Pharmacotherapy- Medications

The use of a particular medicine is determined according to the specific medical needs of each patient and taking into account other factors.
Methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone are medicines that are used to treat opioid abuse and addiction.

  • Methadone

Methadone is a synthetic opiate that is consumed orally, in liquid or capsule form or injected. It is used to treat opioid withdrawal syndrome, which causes symptoms such as anxiety, insomnia, vomiting, fever, muscle pain, diarrhea, and dysphoria.
Often known as the Dolophine brand, methadone can build up in the body if taken too often, making an overdose more likely, and also has high addictive potential. Sometimes used for short-term detoxification purposes, but has been shown to be more effective for longer-term drug-assisted therapy. Because methadone can create a habit, it should be used with caution and taken exclusively as prescribed. by a doctor.

Methadone is usually given to people who cannot maintain abstinence without the help of a substitute. Although the consumption of this substance is ideally only maintained for a few months, in some cases the treatment lasts for life to prevent the consumption of other substances with more serious side effects and the possible spread of diseases.

  • Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist that stimulates the same opioid receptors in the brain that are affected by heroin. Buprenorphine significantly reduces cravings and withdrawal symptoms and is also helpful for people with chronic pain. Common brands of Buprenorphine include Buprenex, Suboxone, and Subutex. Using buprenorphine can be dangerous for someone who is not completely ready to stay clean on heroin.
Buprenorphine is associated with low levels of physical dependence and is less toxic against overdose than other opioids used in maintenance therapy.
Opioid withdrawal can be managed with decreasing doses of buprenorphine over a period of 5 to 14 days.

  • Naltrexone

Also used in the treatment of alcoholism, naltrexone helps prevent heroin from acting in the body by preventing it from reaching the opioid receptors in the body. Also known as Revia or Vivitrol, naltrexone prevents opiates from acting on the brain to relieve pain and cause euphoria, an intense feeling of excitement or joy. Naltrexone does not relieve symptoms of withdrawal syndrome and cannot be administered until Seven to ten days have passed since the last opioid use, when the symptoms of withdrawal syndrome have passed.

There is also a medicine that combines buprenorphine with naloxone. Naloxone is a medication that treats opioid overdose. If you take it with buprenorphine, there is less risk of abusing buprenorphine.

If you want to stop taking them, don’t do it on your own.

Psychotherapies- behavioral treatments

  • Counseling

The various effective behavioral treatments for opioid use disorder can be performed on an outpatient basis or in a residential setting.

Outpatient rehabilitation allows recovering people to receive therapy and medication while continuing to maintain their work and personal lives.

Behavioral therapies for heroin addiction include methods such as cognitive-behavioral therapy and contingency management. Contingency management provides motivational incentives, such as coupons or small cash rewards, that reward positive behaviors, such as Not taking the drug, these therapies have been shown to be effective in treating heroin use disorder, especially when applied in conjunction with medications.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy is designed to help modify the patient’s behavior and expectations regarding drug use and improve their ability to cope with various life stressors. An important task is to identify the best treatment approach for each patient’s particular needs.

  • Group Counseling

Group therapy allows the patient to regulate their emotions and achieve a positive effect that will help them live well without drugs.
Group therapy generally involves one or more therapists who lead a group of 5 to 15 patients. Sessions can range from 1 to 2 hours per week, 1 to 2 days per week. This group setting opens the door to empathy, which is a key step in recovery.

After heroin rehabilitation, continued treatment is crucial to staying sober for the long term. Making regular visits to a therapist helps many recovering heroin addicts stay focused on sobriety. Therapists can help recovering addicts identify and overcome triggers and weaknesses. They can also provide methods of dealing with heroin cravings.

Are you or a loved one looking for help with a Heroin Addiction Treatment in South Florida? We have someone standing by to help and answer any questions. Call Now: (877) 357-3422

Request A Consultation

All conversations are kept private and confidential.

Request an appt 2

Request Our Info Packet

Your Guide To The Recovery Process

Learn everything you need to know about the recovery process and staying sober.

Request Our Info Packet

Your Guide To The Recovery Process

Learn everything you need to know about the recovery process and staying sober.